Clark School Home

Find us On   Facebook Twitter YouTube Linked In

Events

events section

"High Temperature Thermochemical Conversion: Coal to Hydrogen and Sunlight to Fuel"

James Klausner
James Klausner, ARPA-E

Lecture Details

3 p.m., December 7, 2012
Room: 1202 Martin Hall
Reception to follow


"Transforming Energy"
Lecture Series Home

 

A "Transforming Energy" Lecture
by James Klausner
December 7, 2012

Abstract

It is well known that the amount of solar energy striking a 500´500 kilometer portion of the earth is sufficient to meet the current energy demand of the entire planet. As such, the U.S. National Academy of Engineering has cited the economical capture and utilization of solar energy as one of the National Grand Challenges. Making fuels from sunlight is one of the strategic goals in the Department of Energy’s report, New Science for a Secure and Sustainable Energy Future. Because solar energy is an intermittent power source and the most suitable locations for solar power collection are desert regions and generally away from urban centers, it is essential that solar energy collection be coupled with energy storage technologies to be economical. Numerous storage solutions are being pursued, but the chemical storage of solar energy as a fuel is a superior concept due to the high energy density and the existing global infrastructure for fuel transport and storage. This talk will discuss a novel dual cavity, windowless, high temperature chemical reactor that converts concentrated solar thermal energy to Syngas, which is currently under development at the University of Florida.  The cost effective, solar thermochemical production of Syngas, using an iron-based non-volatile metal oxide looping processes as a precursor for clean and carbon neutral synthetic hydrocarbon fuels such as methanol, methane, or synthetic petroleum, is the overarching project goal. The reactor uses water and recycled CO2 as the sole feed-stock and concentrated solar radiation as the sole energy source.  Thus, the solar fuel is completely renewable and carbon neutral. A 5000 sun solar simulator has been developed as an energy driver for the thermochemical reactions.  A highly reactive, high surface area iron-based porous structure has been synthesized using a magnetically stabilized bed sintering technique which has been used for coal-to-hydrogen conversion.  A hybrid reactor kinetic model has been developed and validated over a number of cycles in laboratory scale reactors.  The magnetically stabilized porous structure may also be used as a volumetric absorber and facilitate chemical storage for solar driven steam power plants.  Ongoing work involving the high temperature looping process to convert coal to hydrogen will also be considered.

Biography

Dr. James F. Klausner currently serves as a Program Director at the Advanced Research Projects Agency – Energy (ARPA-E). His main focuses include: waste heat and solar driven, low temperature desalination; solar thermal energy driven synthetic fuel synthesis; heat exchangers for spacecraft; and high heat flux cooling. In addition to his position at ARPA-E, Dr. Klausner is a Newton C. Ebaugh Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Florida.

At the University of Florida, Dr. Klausner served as the Chair of the Energy Strategic Planning Committee from 2009-2012, Interim Director for Electronic Delivery of Graduate Education from 2006-2007, and as Coordinator for the Thermal Science and Fluid Dynamics Research and Education Group in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from 2002-2012. Within the academic engineering community, he is best known for his fundamental science contributions to thermal fluids energy transport. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Sciences, in addition to serving on the editorial boards of the International Journal of Heat and Fluid Flow, Frontiers in Heat and Mass Transfer, and the Open Journal for Thermodynamics. He has authored more than 100 technical publications in the thermal fluid sciences and is author of eight patents or patent applications.

Dr. Klausner received a B.S. in marine systems engineering from the United States Merchant Marine Academy in 1984, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 1986 and 1989, respectively.

 

"Critical Materials Challenges in Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production"

Miller
Eric Miller, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Fuel Cell Technologies Program

Lecture Details

3 p.m., November 16, 2012
Room: 1202 Martin Hall
Reception to follow


"Transforming Energy"
Lecture Series Home

 

A "Transforming Energy" Lecture
by Eric Miller
November 16, 2012

Abstract

The US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCT) has made significant progress in fuel cell technology advancement and cost reduction, highlighted by reducing the cost of automotive fuel cells by more than 80% since 2002.  Research and development of enabling technologies for the widespread production of affordable renewable hydrogen, though, remains a daunting challenge. Near-term utilization of current reforming and electrolytic processes are viewed as necessary for early hydrogen markets, but there remains a critical need for transitioning to industrial-scale renewable hydrogen production for the longer term.  Photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen production, using sunlight to directly split water, is one of the key promising solar-to-hydrogen technologies for large-scale production of affordable renewable hydrogen.   Although PEC water-splitting has been investigated for several decades, the research has focused mainly on titanium-dioxide or other metal-oxide based semiconductor systems which are stable in aqueous electrolytes, but which are generally limited in performance by their excessively wide bandgaps. It is well-understood today that new advanced semiconductor structures utilized in innovative reactor designs are needed for practical large-scale PEC hydrogen-production systems.  Appropriately, the primary DOE R&D efforts in this area focus on the discovery, engineering and optimization of advanced PEC materials, and on the evaluation of promising PEC system designs. In terms of PEC materials, the challenging set of requirements includes adequate light absorption over the solar spectrum, development of photo-induced potentials thermodynamically adequate to split water, high charge separation and carrier collection efficiency, stability in suitable aqueous solutions, and favorable kinetics for the gas evolution reactions. In terms of PEC systems and reactor designs, high conversion efficiency to reduce the solar collection footprint is critical to minimize capital costs.  Promising pathways under investigation in the DOE FCT R&D portfolio for achieving high PEC efficiencies and low hydrogen production costs are discussed in this talk.  Exciting recent progress, including the achievement of new solar-to-hydrogen efficiency records, will be highlighted for specific PEC materials classes, including the III-V crystalline semiconductors, copper-chalcopyrite polycrystalline semiconductors as well as new mixed-metal oxides.

Biography

Dr. Eric L. Miller currently serves as the Hydrogen Production Technology Development Manager with the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program at the US DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Dr. Miller received his Ph.D. and M.S degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of Hawaii at Manoa, with a graduate-level research focus on developing materials for renewable energy conversion applications. He received dual undergraduate degrees from Cornell University in Applied and Engineering Physics and Computer Science. His professional career in alternative energy R&D, with emphasis on solar energy and on hydrogen and fuel cell development, has spanned more than twenty years; including work with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the NASA Lewis (aka Glenn) Research Center, Sunpower Inc., and the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Dr. Miller is generally recognized as a world leader in the field of Photoelectrochemical (PEC) hydrogen production, specializing in semiconductor-based materials, devices and systems for cost-effective PEC solar water-splitting; and currently serves as leader of the PEC task for the International Energy Agency’s Hydrogen Implementing Agreement.

"Analysis of the Accident at Fukushima"

Kelly
John E. Kelly, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Nuclear Reactor Technologies, DOE Office of Nuclear Energy

Lecture Details

3 p.m., November 30, 2012
Room: 1202 Martin Hall
Reception to follow


"Transforming Energy"
Lecture Series Home

 

A "Transforming Energy" Lecture
by John E. Kelly
November 30, 2012

Abstract

The devastating earthquake and tsunami, which resulted in the accident at the
Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, occurred on March 11, 2011. The Department of
Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in collaboration with national
laboratories, nuclear industry and Japanese entities recently completed an effort to
analyze the available data and observations from the Fukushima accident. Dr. Kelly’s
talk will focus on the results of this analysis to date, which attempt to explain the
major events observed in the accident such as fission product release and hydrogen
explosion.. Physics-driven computer animations will be shown which illustrate an
overview of the effects of the earthquake and tsunami as well as the specific effects on
Unit 1.

Biography

Dr. John E. Kelly was appointed Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Reactor Technologies in the Office of Nuclear Energy in October 2010. He is responsible for the Department of Energy's nuclear reactor research and development programs for Light Water Reactors, Gas Cooled Reactors, Small Modular Reactors, and advanced reactor concepts. His office is also responsible for the space and defense power systems program within DOE-NE.

Prior to joining the Department of Energy, Dr. Kelly spent 30 years at Sandia National Laboratories where he was engaged in a broad spectrum of research programs in nuclear reactor safety, advanced nuclear energy technology, and national security. In the reactor safety field, he led efforts to establish the scientific basis for assessing the risks of nuclear power plant operation and specifically those risks associated with potential accident scenarios. His research focused on core melt progression phenomena and led to an improved understanding of the Three Mile Island accident. In the advanced nuclear energy technology field, he led Sandia's efforts to develop advanced concepts for space nuclear power, Generation IV reactors, and proliferation-resistant and safe fuel cycles. These research activities explored new technologies aimed at improving the safety and affordability of nuclear power. In the national security field, he led national efforts to evaluate the safety and technical viability of tritium production technologies.

Dr. Kelly is an active member of the American Nuclear Society and has served on the Nuclear Installations Safety Division for the last 2 decades in a number of leadership positions. His committee work has focused on increasing the publication of scientific work in the nuclear safety field and in developing national positions on the safety of nuclear power.

Born in Detroit, Michigan, Dr. Kelly received his B.S. in nuclear engineering from the University of Michigan in 1976 and his Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1980. Dr. Kelly is married and has three children.

"Renewable Energy Today and Beyond"

Victor Abate
Victor R. Abate, Vice President, Renewable Energy, General Electric

Lecture Details

3 p.m., September 28, 2012
Room: 1202 Martin Hall
Reception to follow


"Transforming Energy"
Lecture Series Home

 

A "Transforming Energy" Lecture
by Victor R. Abate
September 28, 2012

Abstract

Victor Abate will provide an overview of the current state of the renewable energy industry today as well as challenges that lie ahead. He will also discuss how GE is celebrating 10 years of advancing wind energy and how it has become a mainstream energy source and more economical than ever.

Biography

Victor Abate is vice president of GE’s renewable energy business, a leading global provider of wind and solar energy products and services. He assumed this position in November 2005, and is based in Schenectady, New York. Prior to his current role, Abate was vice president of technology for GE ‘s power generation segment, which includes gas, steam, wind, solar and hydro-turbine generators, gasification technologies and integrated gasification combined cycle.

Abate began his GE career in 1990 and has held several management roles in engineering, services, production, and quality. In 1996, he led the large turbine generator business as the quality leader and was subsequently appointed general manager of generator technology. In 1999, Abate assumed responsibility in leading the gas turbine volume ramp up in GE’s power generation segment and in late 2000, was appointed general manager of steam turbine technology. Abate became a GE company officer in 2003.

Originally from Williamstown, Massachusetts, Abate holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Union College and an MBA from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

"The Plight of the Innovator - How to Get Out of It"

A Whiting-Turner Lecture: October 18, 2012

Thomas Fogarty

Dr. Thomas Fogarty, inventor of the balloon catheter, gave a Whiting-Turner Lecture on October 18 as part of the 2012 Fischell Festival.

Students Welcome!

Whiting-Turner
Lecture Series Home


Did You Miss This Lecture?

Watch the webcast.

Biography

Dr. Thomas J. Fogarty is an internationally recognized cardiovascular surgeon, inventor, entrepreneur and vintner.  He has been involved with a wide spectrum of innovations in business and technology. Dr. Fogarty has served as founder/co-founder, and chairman/board member of more than 33 various business and research companies, based on medical devices designed and developed by Fogarty Engineering, Inc. During the past 40 years, he has acquired 135 surgical patents, including the “industry standard” Fogarty balloon catheter and the widely used Aneurx Stent Graft that replaces open surgery aortic aneurysm. Dr. Fogarty is the recipient of countless awards and honors; most significantly, he is the recipient of the Jacobson Innovation Award of the American College of Surgeons, the 2000 Lemelson-MIT prize for Invention and Innovation and was inducted into the Inventors Hall of Fame and the National Academy of Engineering.

Recently, Dr. Fogarty and his colleagues founded the Fogarty Institute for Innovation at El Camino Hospital. The purpose of the institute is to create an environment where innovation in medicine is encouraged, supported and nurtured.

Dr. Fogarty was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and received his undergraduate education at Xavier University and his medical degree from the University of Cincinnati. He completed his residency at the University of Oregon and later served as medical staff president at Stanford Medical Center from 1973-1975. After 13 years directing the Cardiovascular Surgery Program at Sequoia Hospital, Redwood City, Calif., he returned to academic life at Stanford University School of Medicine in July 1993, as professor of surgery. Dr. Fogarty now spends his time creating new medical devices with Fogarty Engineering and the Institute for Innovation.

Abstract

The field of medicine is not always friendly to innovation. The Hippocratic Oath states, “Do no harm,” and so we teach, particularly in surgery, “Do the same things, the same way, to the same people.” The “standard of care” in the legal arena is another factor weighing against innovation; if you do not adhere to the standard of care and your patient develops a complication, you will likely be sued and lose the suit. However, while consistently applying proven approaches is important, and standards have their place, there are significant differences among patients that we must recognize and treat, and new technologies whose promise we must explore. This is where innovation comes in. Innovation means that the new must displace the old—not only old technologies, old concepts and old relationships, but old perspectives. To displace the old, the new must prevail or we must make the old new again. This is the plight of the innovator.


 

"Up in the Ivory Tower or Down in the Trenches: What You Need to Know Before Taking the Leap to Start Your Own Business"

A Whiting-Turner Lecture: October 4, 2012

Alex Mehr '03

Alex Mehr '03, co-founder of Zoosk, gave a Whiting-Turner Lecture on October 4.

Students Welcome!

Whiting-Turner
Lecture Series Home


Did You Miss This Lecture?

Watch the webcast.

Biography

Alex Mehr '03 (@alexmehr) is the co-founder and co-CEO of Zoosk, the romantic social network with 15 million monthly active users from 70 countries. Zoosk's 2011 revenue surpassed $97 million -- doubling year over year. Alex co-founded Zoosk in 2007 alongside Shayan Zadeh, while attending the MBA program at the University of California, Berkeley. To date, the company has raised over $40M in venture funding. Alex holds a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Clark School. Prior to starting Zoosk, he worked as an engineer for NASA and collaborated on several manned and unmanned space flights. In his spare time, Alex is a motorcycle enthusiast and enjoys hiking with his dog 'Lexi,' an adorable Rottweiler mix.

Abstract

Are you constantly coming up with ideas for new businesses but you've never actually pursued any of them? Have you ever wondered what it takes to build one of those ideas into a new company? In this talk, I'll share my approach to evaluating new ideas and business models—knowing how to assess the viability of a new idea is particularly important when you're still on the fence about starting a new company. I'll give you some practical tips on execution and rapid iteration once you've settled on an idea. Finally, I'll share my experience as a "student-preneur" and why, as a student, you are at the best point in your life to take on the risks involved in starting a company. This lecture is based on what I’ve learned building my own company, as well as advising other early-stage entrepreneurs. You can’t find this stuff in your grandma’s entrepreneurship class.


 

“Computational Material Design – From Hard Coatings to Soft Membranes”

Yue Qi
Yue Qi, Chemical Sciences and Materials Process Lab, General Motors R&D Center

Lecture Details

2:00 PM, July 12, 2012
Room 1140 Plant Sciences Building
Reception to follow


"Transforming Energy"
Lecture Series Home

 

A "Transforming Energy" Lecture
by Yue Qi
July 12, 2012

Abstract

Dramatic improvements have been made in computational techniques at different scales in the past few decades. This presentation briefly overviews how computational materials modeling has been integrated with research on lightweight energy storage materials in the auto industry. By transferring parameters, equations, and insights obtained from smaller to larger scales, combining and overlapping techniques has moved materials modeling into a truly multi-scale era. To improve Al alloy forming and machining, atomic simulations were integrated into aluminum high temperature forming modeling and used to guide a coating development to machine aluminum alloys. In another case, a coarse-graining approach was developed to obtain the morphologies of hydrated Nafion for fuel cells, where the network connectivity of hydrophilic domains strongly influences the proton conductivity and mechanical property of the membrane. Materials modeling did not stop at explaining existing data or confirming experimental findings, but it made an experimentally testable prediction for optimizing material structures and processing conditions before material synthesis. Predictive capability can lead to more efficient energy conversion and longer lasting materials.

Biography

Yue Qi is a staff research scientist working on computational materials sciences at the General Motors R&D Center Materials and Processes Lab. Her research spans hard coatings, lightweight alloys, proton exchange membranes, and various nano-structured materials for energy storage. She completed her B.S. degree (materials science and computer science) at Tsinghua University, China in 1996. She received her Ph.D. in materials science (minor in computer science) from California Institute of Technology in 2001. She then joined GM as a senior research scientist.

She received the 2006 GM Campbell Award for “Advances in Nano-scale Plasticity.” She was the co-recipient of 1999 Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology for Theoretical Work with T. Cagin and Prof. W. A. Goddard III (Ph.D. advisor).

"United States Energy Security: Challenges and Opportunities"


Vice Adm. Dennis V. McGinn, (USN, Retired), President, American Council on Renewable Energy (ACORE)

Lecture Details

11:00 AM, May 17, 2012
Room: Banneker Room, 2212 Stamp Student Union
Reception to follow


"Transforming Energy"
Lecture Series Home

 

A "Transforming Energy" Lecture
by Vice Adm. Dennis V. McGinn
May 17, 2012

Abstract

Vice Adm. McGinn will discuss the relationship of the United States’ energy, economic, and environmental security challenges in the strategic context of our overarching national security. As daunting as these interlinked challenges appear, they provide significant opportunities for the United States to move beyond a short-term "business as usual" approach to a position of global energy technology leadership. Universities play a critical role in helping us seize these opportunities and create a more secure, healthy and prosperous America.

Biography

Vice Adm. Dennis V. McGinn, USN (retired) is the president of the American Council On Renewable Energy (ACORE), a 501(c)(3) membership non-profit organization dedicated to creating a more secure and prosperous America with clean, renewable energy.

Admiral McGinn is a naval aviator, test pilot and national security strategist. He has served as Director of the Air Warfare Division in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations; the Commander of the U.S. Third Fleet; and the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations, Warfare Requirements and Programs in the Pentagon.

Admiral McGinn brings to ACORE his significant national experience in efforts to highlight the close link between energy, climate and national security. He is a strong advocate for innovative government policy, public and private partnerships, and investments that will promote clean energy growth and innovation.

"Our Energy Future is Happening Right Now"

James L. Connaughton
James L. Connaughton
Executive Vice President,
Corporate Affairs
Public & Environmental Policy, Constellation Energy

Lecture Details

3:00 PM, April 27, 2012
Room: 1202 Martin Hall
Reception to follow


"Transforming Energy"
Lecture Series Home

 

A "Transforming Energy" Lecture by James L. Connaughton
April 27, 2012

Abstract

The Honorable James L. Connaughton, former Chairman of the White House Council on Environmental Quality and current Executive Vice President and Senior Policy Advisor of Exelon Corporation, will discuss how the powerful combination of expanded competition and customer choice, IT integration, and smarter government policy will drive greater innovation, better pricing, and significantly accelerated environmental improvement in our energy system in the U.S. and globally. Mr. Connaughton will also discuss what is
working and not working in both the marketplace and political arenas toward achieving that outcome.

Biography

James L. Connaughton directs Constellation Energy’s environmental and energy policy matters, as well as public and government affairs. Prior to joining Constellation Energy in 2009, Mr. Connaughton served as chairman, White House Council on Environmental Quality from 2000-2009. In this capacity, he served on President Bush’s senior staff as senior environment, energy, and natural resources advisor, and as director of the White House Office of Environmental Policy.

Internationally, he helped establish a broad series of technology initiatives, the public-private Asia Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate Change, and the Major Economies Leaders Meetings on Energy and Climate, in which Mr. Connaughton served as the president’s personal representative. He also played a leading role in other major initiatives that included new air quality standards, major reductions in air pollutionfrom a variety of stationary and mobile sources, plus several other significant conservation, preservation, and restoration initiatives. Prior to his public service, Mr. Connaughton was a partner in the environmental practice group at the law firm Sidley Austin, where he played a leading role in the development and implementation of the ISO 14000 series of international environmental management and performance standards.

Mr. Connaughton is a member of the Board of Directors of CENT (a nuclear energy joint venture) and a member of the Board of Governors of the Argonne National Laboratory. He is also on the Board of Directors of the National Aquarium Institute and a Trustee of the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation. A native of Maryland, he is a graduate of Yale University and graduated second in his class, magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from the Northwestern University School of Law. In 2008, Northwestern University honored him with its Distinguished Alumni Award.

The Clark School Engineering Sustainability Workshop 2012

This Year's Workshop

2012 Workshop: Solar

Webcast Schedule

Morning Session I (9 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.

Break in webcast coverage at speaker request

Morning Session II (11:15 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.)

Break in webcast for lunch

Keynote Session (12:15 to 1 p.m.)

Parallel Sessions in Kay West and Closing Session (1-3:15 p.m.)

Parallel Sessions in Kay East (1-2:45 p.m.)

Workshop Closing (2:45 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.)

Video Contest

Guidelines for the Engineering Sustainability Video Contest

Handouts
Workshop Archives

2011 Workshop: Energy

2010 Workshop: Water

2009 Workshop: Energy

 

 

Sustainability 2012

Focus 2012: Solar Energy

April 26, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Kay Boardrooms and Rotunda
Jeong H. Kim Engineering Building, College Park, MD
Co-sponsored by the University of Maryland Energy Research Center and the University of Maryland Office of Sustainability

 

The agenda for the workshop is as follows:

Morning Session: Unified Kay Boardrooms
9:00-9:05 Welcome: by Dean Darryll Pines
9:05-9:30 "Outcomes Research of Small-Scale Solar Development in Burkina Faso" by Matthew Conway and George Kinchen, Student Members, University of Maryland Chapter of Engineers Without Borders
9:30-10:00 "Pivoting Towards the Sun: Engineering Innovation in Small-Scale Solar" by Jackson Yang, Maryland Clean Energy Entrepreneur of the Year
10:00-10:15 Break
10:15-10:45 "Solar Installations at the University of Maryland" by Susan Corry, Energy Projects and Conservation Manager, University of Maryland, College Park
10:45-11:15 "Ivanpah Solar Thermal Project" by James Ivany, President, Bechtel Renewable Power
11:15-11:45 "Watershed: An Integrative and Innovative Entry to the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011" by David Daily, Student Team Member, University of Maryland Solar Decathlon Team
11:45-12:15 Light Lunch/Exhibitions in the Rotunda by Student Groups, Campus Programs and External Organizations
12:15-1:00 Keynote: "The DOE SunShot Initiative: Science and Technology to Enable Solar Electricity at Grid Parity" by R. Ramesh, SunShot Program Director, U.S. Department of Energy
Afternoon Sessions: Parallel Speakers: Divided Kay Boardrooms
Kay Boardroom East
1:00-1:15 "University of Maryland Energy Research Center Overview" by Eric Wachsman, Professor and Director, UMERC
1:15-1:30 "Novel Method for Photovoltaic Energy Conversion Using Surface Acoustic Waves in Piezoelectric Semiconductors" by Victor Yakovenko, Professor, Physics
1:30-1:45 "Home Installation of Solar Panels" by Victor Yakovenko, Professor, Physics, and Brian Desmond, Field Sales Manager, Standard Solar
1:45-2:00 "Engineering the Flow of Light for High-Efficiency Solar Cells" by Jeremy Munday, Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering
2:00-2:15 "CZTS Solar Cells with Advanced Light Trapping" by Colin Preston, Graduate Student, Materials Science and Engineering
2:15-2:30 "The Maryland Education Solar Array" by Bryan Quinn, Director of Technical Operations, Electrical and Computer Engineering
2:30-2:45 "Connecting Solar Cell Performance to Manufacturing Choices by Predictive Modeling" by Raymond Adomaitis, Professor, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Kay Boardroom West
1:00-1:15 "Solar Energy System Reliability Assessment and Improvement" by Diganta Das, Abhijit Dasgupta and Patrick McClusky, Mechanical Engineering
1:15-1:30 "Liquid Crystals and Their Contribution to the Field of Organic Photovoltaics" by Luz Martinez-Miranda, Associate Professor, Materials Science and Engineering
1:30-1:45 "Concentrated Solar Thermal Energy for H20 and C02 Splitting" by Greg Jackson, Professor and Associate Director, UMERC
1:45-2:00 "ZNO Nanoparticles and Nanowires with Liquid Crystal for Photovoltaic Applications" by Lourdes Salamanca-Riba, Professor, Materials Science and Engineering
2:00-2:15 "Solar Water Heating: Engineering, Policy and Economic Challenges to Mass Deployment" by Craig Marlowe, Consultant, Maryland Task Force on Solar Water Heating, and Graduate, Master of Engineering and Public Policy Program
2:15-2:30 "Bio-Template Nanostructures for Photoelectrochemical Cell Applications" by Chia-Ying Chiang, Graduate Student, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
2:30-2:45 "Towards High-Efficiency Organic Solar Cells" by Miriam Cezza, Graduate Student, Materials Science and Engineering
2:45-3:00 Break
Afternoon Session II: Unified Kay Boardrooms
2:45-3:15 Dean Pines:
  • Announces the winners of the student video competition and presents the videos.
  • Solicits energy research, education, entrepreneurship, service project ideas from the audience.
  • Concludes the workshop.
5-6 p.m. Whiting-Turner Business and Entrepreneurial Lecture: "Making Solar Power a Reality in California" by Stephen Zaminski '86, CEO, Solar Gen 2 LLC