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Strategy for Technology Development

Ray O. Johnson

Ray O. Johnson, senior vice president and CTO of Lockheed Martin Corporation, gave the first lecture of the fall 2007 semester. - Photo by Al Santos.

Date: Nov 8, 2007
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: 1110 Kim Engineering Building


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A Whiting-Turner Lecture by Ray Johnson— November 8 , 2007

Abstract

From the perspective of one of the world's leading technology corporations, Ray Johnson will discuss the imperatives that drive successful technology development and transition including macro global trends, organizational issues, and how to prioritize research and development investments.

Biography

Dr. Ray Johnson is the senior vice president and chief technology officer of the Lockheed Martin Corporation. Johnson guides the company's technology vision and provides corporate leadership in the strategic areas of technology and engineering, which include more than 65,000 people working on more than 4,000 programs. Johnson also leads the corporation's Advanced Concepts Organization and the Center for Innovation, a world-class laboratory for collaborative experimentation and analysis involving Lockheed Martin, its customers and industry partners.

Before joining Lockheed Martin, Johnson was the chief operating officer for Modern Technology Solutions, Inc. (MTSI), of Alexandria, Va. Prior to that, he held a variety of increasingly responsible executive positions with Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), including senior vice president and general manager of the Advanced Concepts Business Unit. In addition to executive leadership and management positions, Johnson has experience in strategic planning, program development, program management, and venture capital funding. He currently serves as a member of the Sandia Corporation Board of Directors. He previously served on the boards of two biotechnology companies.

Johnson was a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board from 2001 to 2005, where he chaired the 2003 summer study titled "Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in Perspective: Effects, Capabilities, and Technologies," and co-chaired the 2002 summer study, "Predictive Battlespace Awareness." He participated in several additional summer studies and science and technology reviews. His Air Force career included assignments in laser physics and systems design and analysis, electro-optic systems research and development, survivability, and command and control. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the International Society for Optical Engineering, Eta Kappa Nu, Tau Beta Pi and Phi Kappa Phi.

Born in Kansas City, Mo., Johnson holds a B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Oklahoma State University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology.

Satellite Radio

Robert Briskman

Robert Briskman, co-founder of SIRIUS Satellite Radio, delivered the final lecture of the fall semester.

Date: Nov 29, 2007
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: 1110 Kim Engineering Building


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A Whiting-Turner Lecture by Robert Briskman, M.S. '61— November 29, 2007

Abstract

The first new commercial radio service in over one half century, called satellite radio, has been created during the past several years. One of the corporations now providing this service of over 130 audio channels to approximately 8 million subscribers throughout the continental United States and Canada is Sirius Satellite Radio.

Its co-founder, Rob Briskman, will describe the general characteristics of the service and implementations worldwide. The development of satellite radio by Sirius will then be covered both as to its engineering and commercial progress. Special focus will be provided on the unique enabling technologies. Briskman will conclude with some personal thoughts on creation of new consumer services, particularly the balance between business drivers, technology and financing.

Biography

Robert Briskman received his Bachelor of Science degree from Princeton University and a Master of Science in electrical engineering from the Clark School. He has been involved with the implementation of satellite communications systems since their inception. Briskman co-founded Sirius Satellite Radio in 1991 serving as executive vice president of engineering and currently as technical executive, where he was responsible for the implementation of its satellite radio broadcasting system to mobile subscribers in the United States.

Briskman was employed by the Geostar Corporation from 1986 to 1990, where he was senior vice president of engineering. Briskman was with COMSAT from 1964 through 1985, where he last was responsible for providing technical services in the areas of satellites, earth stations and telecommunications systems. He was vice president of system implementation of COMSAT General Corporation. Prior to joining COMSAT, Briskman was chief of program support for the Office of Tracking and Data Acquisition at NASA and received the APOLLO Achievement Award from NASA. He worked for the Army Security Agency and IBM before NASA.

Briskman is a fellow and past director, vice president for technical activities and secretary-treasurer of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers and a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, which gave him the 2007 Aerospace Communications Award. He has authored more than 50 technical papers, holds many U.S. and foreign patents, served on the Industry Advisory Council to NASA and has been inducted into the Society for Satellite Professionals International and the Space Foundation Halls of Fame.

 

"Perspectives on Innovation: The Top Ten Tips"

William Brody

William Brody, president of Johns Hopkins University & entrepreneur, delivered the first lecture of the spring semester. This lecture was part of the 2nd Annual Fischell Festival of Bioengineering (Photo by Al Santos).

Date: April 10
Time: 5 p.m. (preceded by a reception at 4:30 p.m.)
Location: Kim Engineering Building lecture hall


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A Whiting-Turner Lecture — April 10

Abstract

In 1879, when Johns Hopkins chemistry professor (and later university president) Ira Remsen discovered saccharin, he declared he "wouldn't soil his hands" with industry by commercializing the new product. So instead his assistant Constantin Fahlberg took out the patent—and subsequently made a fortune.

Innovation is widely understood to be the driving force behind successful companies, and for many, the wellspring of wealth. What is the role of discovery, patenting and entrepreneurial initiative in academic research? How can we identify and support winning innovations that can succeed in the marketplace? Johns Hopkins University president Bill Brody has a unique perspective on technology transfer. He heads one of the nation’s leading discovery-generating enterprises (in the past 8 years, Hopkins researchers have disclosed 1,054 inventions and applied for 1,223 patents, leading to the creation of 17 new companies); he is a former board member of one of the nation’s leading medical device corporations; and he has personally participated in the creation of three separate medical device companies. From this wide-ranging experience Dr. Brody has developed a thought-provoking set of precepts—including "The Five Phases of Innovation" and "The Top Ten Ingredients in the Recipe for Success"—that suggest new ways of looking at discovery and innovation.

Biography

William R. Brody became the 13th president of The Johns Hopkins University on Sept. 1, 1996. Immediately prior to assuming the position, Dr. Brody was the provost of the Academic Health Center at the University of Minnesota. From 1987 to 1994, he was the Martin Donner Professor and director of the Department of Radiology, professor of electrical and computer engineering, and professor of biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins, and radiologist-in-chief of The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

A native of Stockton, Calif., Dr. Brody received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and his M.D. and Ph.D., also in electrical engineering, from Stanford University. Following post-graduate training in cardiovascular surgery and radiology at Stanford, the National Institutes of Health and the University of California, San Francisco, Dr. Brody was professor of radiology and electrical engineering at Stanford University (1977-1986). He has been a co-founder of three medical device companies, and served as the president and chief executive officer of Resonex Inc. from 1984 to 1987. He has over 100 publications and one U.S. patent in the field of medical imaging and has made contributions in medical acoustics, computed tomography, digital radiography and magnetic resonance imaging.

Dr. Brody serves as a trustee of The Commonwealth Fund and of the Baltimore Community Foundation. He serves on the board of directors of IBM. He is a member of the executive committee of the Council on Competitiveness, the International Academic Advisory Committee, Singapore, and the FBI's National Security Higher Education Advisory Board. He formerly served on the President's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board, on the board of the Minnesota Orchestra Association and on the Corporation of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Brody is a member of the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Engineering, and a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, the American College of Radiology, the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, the American Institute of Biomedical Engineering, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Brody is a private pilot holding airline transport pilot and flight instructor ratings.

"Plan B"

Fred Schaufeld

Fred Schaufeld, chairman and founder of NEW Customer Service Companies, Inc., delivered the final lecture of the spring semester (Photo by Al Santos).

Date: April 17
Time: 5 p.m. (preceded by a reception at 4:30 p.m.)
Location: Kim Engineering Building lecture hall


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A Whiting-Turner Lecture —April 17

Abstract

What happens when things don't work exactly as planned? In this personal story, Fred Schaufeld, Founder and Chairman of NEW Customer Service Companies, Inc., will discuss how responding to unexpected family and business crises—and to unexpected results when advanced technology interfaces with average consumers—allowed this entrepreneur, only two years out of college to follow "Plan B" and build a multi-billion dollar enterprise on a $79 investment. Mr. Schaufeld will share "war stories" about building and selling a business; provide a glimpse into how his company handles over 15 million consumer claims each year; and discuss what's next.

Biography

Fred Schaufeld founded NEW in 1983 while attending law school. His initial $79 investment has mushroomed into a progressive company that was recently recognized for "an outstanding customer service experience" by the JD Power and Associates - the first service plan administrator ever to receive this recognition. His vision and penchant for superior customer service has helped NEW develop a blue-chip client list of industry leaders in retailing, financial services, and manufacturing. Building on a commitment to prompt, attentive customer service, Schaufeld engineered numerous innovations that have kept NEW ahead of its competition. NEW was the first service contract administrator to fully insure the obligations under those contracts. In addition, NEW was the first retail administrator to offer round-the-clock customer service, and it remains the only service contract provider to hold a patent on packaged extended service contracts. Schaufeld holds a degree from Lehigh University, is a founding member and the former president of the Service Contract Industry Council, the national association for service contract providers, a member of the Young Presidents' Organization in Washington, D.C., a member of the Loudoun County Chamber of Commerce, and sits on a number of corporate and philanthropic boards. In 1998, Ernst & Young named Schaufeld as its Entrepreneur of the Year in the Washington, D.C., Service Industry category.

"Thriving in Uncertainty: How Leading Corporations Apply 'Lean Dynamics' to Drive New Innovation and Value"

Stephen Ruffa

Stephen A. Ruffa, B.S. '82, aerospace engineering, and author of Going Lean, gave the final Whiting-Turner Business & Entrepreneurial Lecture of the fall semester. (Photo by Al Santos.)


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Going Len by Stephen Ruffa

Going Lean, was published in June. Learn more about Going Lean here: www.goinglean.net


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A Whiting-Turner Lecture — November 6, 2008

Abstract

What happens to most companies when the economy dives, fuel prices spike, or crisis strikes? Manufacturers, retailers, airlines and others face a downward cycle of loss, sending turmoil across their corporations, suppliers, and ultimately to their customers—compromising their ability to hold down costs and turn out the quality and innovation so essential to profitability and growth. But this need not be the result. Drawing on his unique study of aerospace manufacturing, his demonstration projects, and research on today’s leaders across manufacturing and service industries, author Stephen Ruffa describes how some companies have managed to defy conventional wisdom. By applying “lean dynamics” principles, these firms consistently thrive in today’s challenging business environment, sustaining profitability, growth, and innovation.

Biography

Stephen A. Ruffa is the author of Going Lean: How the Best Companies Apply Lean Manufacturing Principles to Shatter Uncertainty, Drive Innovation, and Maximize Profits (AMACOM, 2008), and is the first to describe the principles of lean dynamics. He worked for the U.S. Defense Department for a quarter century as an engineer and a manager, engaged in supporting many of its dynamic needs—from the design, manufacture, test, and repair of cutting-edge aircraft, to projects ensuring the availability of critical supplies for wartime demand surges.

Ruffa's works have been widely recognized; his previous book, Breaking the Cost Barrier: A Proven Approach to Managing and Implementing Lean Manufacturing (John Wiley & Sons, 2000), was awarded the 2001 Shingo Prize for Excellence in Manufacturing Research. He is currently President of Lean Dynamics Research, a research, training, and management advisory firm focused on lean dynamics principles and practices. Ruffa received his B.S. degree in Aerospace Engineering and M.S. Degree in Technology Management from University of Maryland.

"Looking Ahead"

Gordon England
Gordon England '61, U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense, gave the first Whiting-Turner Business & Entrepreneurial Lecture Series of the Fall 2008 semester. (Photo by Al Santos.)

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A Whiting-Turner Lecture — October 16

Abstract

Secretary England will give his perspectives on what the future will hold for Clark School of Engineering students based on his own experiences as a student here and more than 40 years of experience as an engineer, industry executive and an official at the highest level of the federal government.

Biography

Gordon England is the 29th Deputy Secretary of Defense. He previously served as the 72nd and 73rd Secretary of the Navy and as the first Deputy Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security.

Prior to joining the administration of President George W. Bush, Mr. England served as President of the General Dynamics Fort Worth Aircraft Company (later Lockheed), President of the General Dynamics Land Systems Company and as corporate Executive Vice President of General Dynamics Information Systems and Technology Sector, Ground Combat Systems Sector and the International Sector. His business career spanned over 40 years as an engineer and senior executive.

A native of Baltimore, Mr. England graduated from the University of Maryland in 1961 with a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering. In 1975 he earned a master's degree in business administration from the M.J. Neeley School of Business at Texas Christian University and was a member of business, engineering and leadership honor societies.

Mr. England has served in a variety of civic, charitable and government organizations, including serving as a city councilman; Vice Chair, national Board of Goodwill, International; the USO's Board of Governors; the Defense Science Board; the Board of Visitors at Texas Christian University; and many others.

He has been recognized for numerous professional and service contributions by multiple universities and organizations.

"The Business of Social Media"

Hooman Radfar

Hooman Radfar, CEO and co-founder of Clearspring, gave the first Whiting-Turner lecture of the spring semester on April 2.

Date: April 2
Time: 5 p.m.
Location: 1110 Kim Engineering Building


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A Whiting-Turner Lecture — April 2, 2009

Abstract

Social media is dead. Long live social media. That's the theme of the CEO of the web's largest-reaching social distribution company, Clearspring Technologies. Social networking and publishing platforms like Facebook, Wordpress, and MySpace are taking the world by storm. The web is no longer a mechanism for simple publishing. It has become the platform for delivering users services via APIs, widgets, and applications. Social media is not a new category of media. All media online is swiftly becoming social. Hooman Radfar will discuss the changing media landscape, the forces driving the changes, and how Internet companies can succeed in this brave new world.

Biography

Hooman Radfar, 28, is founder & CEO of Clearspring Technologies. Radfar co-founded Clearspring in 2004 after graduating from Carnegie Mellon University with an M.S. in Electrical Engineering. At Clearspring, he drives platform and strategy initiatives, where he helps major media companies and marketers, such as NBC Universal, NBA, Time, Turner, and Disney efficiently distribute and track their content across the web.

Radfar has been working in the social media space for more than five years. During this period he has been dedicated to defining the standards, economic models, and innovation that define the next phase of the web, loosely termed as Web 2.0/3.0. At Clearspring, he aims to create the platform and business models for the distributed web and allow its participants to share in the huge upside of this new ecosystem.

BusinessWeek.com featured Radfar as one of "The Wizards of Widgets" and named him one of "Technology's Best Young Entrepreneurs" most likely to shape the world's digital future. He was also nominated for Ernst & Young’s "Entrepreneur of the Year." He is a frequent speaker at technology conferences including Widgets Live, Web 2.0 Expo, and WidgetCon. He is often quoted in major media, including The Washington Post, BusinessWeek and Red Herring. When he is not busy building a better Web, you can find him writing his blog Widgify.

Radfar graduated magna cum laude from the University of Pennsylvania with degrees in economics and computer science. He also received an M.S. from Carnegie Mellon University, where he researched social networks and distributed systems.

"Innovation in Medical Technology"

Harvey Fineberg

Harvey Fineberg, president of the National Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, gave a Whiting-Turner lecture as part of the 3rd Annual Fischell Festival of Bioengineering.

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A Whiting-Turner Lecture — April 21, 2009

Abstract

One of America's strengths has been a robust research and development enterprise in advancing medical technology that can save live and improve the quality of life. At the same time, many economic analyses ascribe a high share of the rising costs of health care to increasing use of medical technology. This talk will explore the following question: Is it possible to promote and realize the benefits of new science and technology for health and at the same time to maintain an affordable health system? Special emphasis will be placed on the role of comparative-effectiveness research and other policy tools to achieve these dual goals.

Biography

Harvey V. Fineberg is president of the Institute of Medicine. He served as provost of Harvard University from 1997 to 2001, following thirteen years as dean of the Harvard School of Public Health. He has devoted most of his academic career to the fields of health policy and medical decision making. His past research has focused on the process of policy development and implementation, assessment of medical technology, evaluation and use of vaccines and dissemination of medical innovations.

Dr. Fineberg helped found and served as president of the Society for Medical Decision Making and also served as consultant to the World Health Organization. At the Institute of Medicine, he has chaired and served on a number of panels dealing with health policy issues, ranging from AIDS to new medical technology. He also served as a member of the Public Health Council of Massachusetts (1976-1979), as chairman of the Health Care Technology Study Section of the National Center for Health Services Research (1982-1985), and as president of the Association of Schools of Public Health (1995-1996).

Dr. Fineberg is co-author of the books Clinical Decision Analysis, Innovators in Physician Education, and The Epidemic that Never Was, an analysis of the controversial federal immunization program against swine flu in 1976. He has co-edited several books on such diverse topics as AIDS prevention, vaccine safety and understanding risk in society. He has also authored numerous articles published in professional journals. Dr. Fineberg is the recipient of several honorary degrees and the Joseph W. Mountin Prize from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. He earned his bachelor's and doctoral degrees from Harvard University.

"Entrepreneurial Leadership in the New Economy"

S. Tien Wong

S. Tien Wong, chairman and CEO of Opus8, Inc., deliver the last lecture of the fall semester.

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A Whiting-Turner Lecture — November 19, 2009

Abstract

Serial entrepreneur and private investor S .Tien Wong will present his thoughts on what it will take to succeed in the new economy. The business and economic climates have radically changed in the past 18 months. Business is as challenging and competitive as ever, capital is scarce, and customers are more demanding. What does this mean for entrepreneurs and future leaders? Wong will draw on his experience as Founder and CEO of one of the world's largest customer relationship management (CRM) companies, as well as his experience in investing in and acquiring business services and technology companies. Topics will include the changing nature of customer service, private equity, IT and the emergence of China as a powerhouse, and how these trends may alter the way we need to conduct business and train our future business leaders.

Biography

S. Tien Wong is chairman and CEO of Opus8, Inc., a Maryland-based private investment firm specializing in middle market buyouts, private equity and venture capital investment. The firm seeks to acquire North American call center, customer relationship management and outsourced marketing services and technology companies. Opus8 also makes venture capital investments in emerging outsourcing companies in China.

In 2008, Wong acquired a majority interest in and became chairman and CEO of Lore Systems, Inc., an advanced IT services company in the Washington, D.C., area. Lore provides world-class managed datacenter hosting and colocation services, consulting and support to a diverse base of over 300 clients.

Wong co-founded and served as CEO of CyberRep, Inc., until its acquisition in 2003 by Affiliated Computer Services. Prior to co-founding CyberRep, he worked for ten years in commercial real estate finance and investments.

In 2001 Wong won the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year award for Greater Washington. He is an "Entrepreneur in Residence" at the Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business, and frequently lectures at major universities.

Wong is a current or former member or trustee of numerous boards. He is a graduate of Dartmouth College, where he majored in government.

"Moving Forward with the Nuclear Renaissance in the United States"

George Vanderheyden

George Vanderheyden, president and CEO of UniStar Nuclear Energy, delivered the first lecture of the Fall 2009 semester.

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A Whiting-Turner Lecture  — November 5, 2009

Abstract

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 set the stage for the renaissance of nuclear energy in the United States. A small group of companies have emerged as the front runners on the leading edge of what will be some of the largest and most complex projects in recent U.S. history.

UniStar Nuclear Energy is driving forward with its business model of building a fleet of advanced nuclear technology facilities while managing the ever-changing risks of doing business in 2009. The obstacles and opportunities of being on the leading edge of the nuclear curve will be illustrated as well as the benefits of new nuclear in the United States.

Biography

As president and chief executive officer of UniStar Nuclear Energy (UNE), a Constellation Energy and EDF company, George Vanderheyden is responsible for leading UNE’s efforts to develop and deploy the first new generation of nuclear power plants in North America in more than 30 years.

Vanderheyden also serves as senior vice president of Constellation Energy's Nuclear Group, overseeing Constellation’s new nuclear interests, and president of UniStar Nuclear, LLC, a joint venture with AREVA, NP, to market a version of AREVA’s evolutionary power reactor technology, adapted specifically for the United States. He joined Constellation Energy in 2003 as Constellation Generation Group’s vice president of asset optimization. Within a few months, he became vice president at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant.

Vanderheyden holds a bachelor’s degree from Northern Illinois University in nuclear engineering technology. He is a member of the Engineering / Engineering Technology / Electronics Programs Advisory Council for the College of Southern Maryland, and a board member for the USS Constellation Museum. He was a member of IBEW Local 15 for five years.