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Keystone Academy Fosters Great Fundamental Teaching

Dr. William Fourney, lead Keystone Professor

Dr. William Fourney, lead Keystone Professor

Six professors have been named to Keystone: The Clark School Academy of Distinguished Professors.

William Fourney, chair and professor of aerospace engineering, was selected as lead Keystone Professor. The other Keystone professors are Peter Kofinas, chemical and biomolecular engineering; Bruce Jacob, electrical and computer engineering (ECE); Wesley Lawson (ECE); Kenneth Kiger, mechanical engineering (ME); and Guangming Zhang (ME and Institute for Systems Research).

The program fosters exemplary undergraduate teaching skills and commitment to excellence in fundamental engineering courses.

Keystone professors receive renewable three-year appointments with a base salary increase and discretionary funds to support their activities, and are assisted by additional support personnel in covered courses.

ENES 100: "Introduction to Engineering" is the first course covered by Keystone. Other fundamental engineering courses will be included in the future.

"Keystone will help to improve student retention and graduation rates by ensuring students the best possible learning experience in the early, formative stages," said Nariman Farvardin, professor and dean. "In the long term, Keystone will help to attract more students to the Clark School, further enhance the school's already strong academic reputation and produce alumni and alumnae who have an even deeper connection to the school because of the great teachers they found here."

January 18, 2006


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